Tips & Tricks for GT Parents

  • How To Make Sure Your Math Anxiety Doesn't Make Your Kids Hate Math

    For many adults, this is what they feel when faced with difficult math. However, for kids, math anxiety isn't just a feeling, it can affect their ability to do well in school. This fear tends to creep up on students when performance matters the most, like during exams or while speaking in class. One reason for a kid's math anxiety? How their parents feel about the subject.

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  • Does my child need help with their anxiety?

    It’s usual for children to feel anxious or fearful about a variety of different things. After all, children are confronted with all sorts of new experiences and challenges as they grow up and learn about the world around them. In most cases these fears are transitory and do not significantly interfere with a child’s academic, social or family life.

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  • Anxiety in Gifted Children: 3 Simple Steps Parents and Educators Can Take

    In school, fear of failure, perfectionism, and not being able to live up to the expectations many may have for their high potential can leave our gifted children so anxious that they crumble. Whether you are a teacher in a traditional school with gifted students in your class, a parent of a gifted child in traditional school, or you homeschool your gifted child, being mindful that anxiety can plague our gifted children is the first step in easing the effects of anxiety in their lives.

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  • Homework Anxiety: What You Need to Know

    "Does your child seem to spend more time worrying about homework than actually doing it? Homework anxiety isn’t unusual, and it isn’t necessarily bad. In fact, a little bit of worry can be a motivator: “I know this is hard, but I’m pretty sure I can do it.” But when kids feel a lot of stress or anxiety, it can have the opposite effect."

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  • Anxiety and 2e Kids

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, anxiety disorders are among the most common mental, emotional, and behavioral problems during childhood and adolescence. About 13 of every 100 children and adolescents between the ages of 9 to 17 experience some kind of anxiety disorder. More girls are affected than boys. More than half of those with anxiety experience an additional disorder such as depression.

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  • Tips for Parents: Anxiety, Sensitivities and Social Struggles among Profoundly Gifted Kids

    Dealing with anxiety, sensitivities and social difficulties is a pertinent topic for many parents whose profoundly gifted children have struggled with these issues at various times in their development. Oftentimes, these challenges influence each other, making potential solutions complex. In this article, I will summarize some of the ways anxiety, sensitivity, and social problems can manifest in profoundly gifted children and provide suggestions about how to help them (and you!) cope.

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  • Management of anxiety begins at home

    "Parents of gifted children are often concerned about their children’s anxiety, and with good reason. Research indicates that 12% to 20% of all children experience anxiety severe enough to refer them for treatment, and approximately 3% to 5% of all children are diagnosed with a variety of anxiety disorders. Regrettably, children do not always express their anxiety in the form of “Mom, I am anxious,”or “Dad, I am afraid.” "

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  • Neuroscience of Anxiety in the Bright Brain

    Bright individuals may be more prone to disabling and destructive elements of anxiety because they typically have expanded emotional brain networks, increased sensory processing, and elevated physiological responses to stressors, both real and imagined. Intelligent people report 25% greater rates of anxiety compared to the national average.

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